Compare and Contrast

Getting a reward for Risa during the trick training portion of the event.  It almost looks like focus!

Getting a reward for Risa during the trick training portion of the event. It almost looks like focus!

I’m really glad I posted my Throwback Thursday entry this past week. It gave me insight and a nice reminder of where we’ve come from. And exactly how much Risa has improved.

This last Saturday was the Canine Carnival: a festival of sorts highlighting animal rescue in the area. It’s a huge event that draws immense crowds and plenty of rescue groups, local pet stores, trainers, dog daycares, etc. I’ve actually taken Risa to it several times. The first few times were to work on her reactivity and fearfulness. The last three years we’ve put on a demonstration of canine freestyle.

We volunteered to dance again this year but, this time, with our local training club. It really was the right decision and saved me from having to sit alone in a booth all day. On top of that change, the event was held at a completely different location having outgrown the original space.

This put a lot of potential stress on Risa. Firstly, it’s HUGE and a bit chaotic. This I know from previous years. Secondly, it’s now at a new location and the new is always tough for Ris. However, I also know how far she’s come and I knew she could handle it. I knew she wouldn’t be as focused and precise dancing as she typically is in competition. We simply haven’t trained to that level of distraction. I did know, however, that she would still work with me and not be overly stressed out.

I was pleasantly surprised when we arrived and I got Risa out of the car. She wasn’t worried at all. No tucked tail. No trembling. No hesitation. She just got out and we were on our way. 🙂 I gave her plenty of time to scope things out. We walked around near the demo ring and she got to sniff and wander at her own pace. It was still early so there wasn’t much of a crowd which allowed her a lot more freedom. I was even able to get her in the ring so she could investigate the scents in there. While inside the ring, I worked with her on some focus exercises that I learned in the Fenzi Dog Sports Academy class we’re taking. I was impressed; she was able to focus pretty well and complete the tasks I asked. Since there was agility equipment set up, I was also able to let her take the tunnel and use it as a reward. She loves the tunnel!

She spent most of the event in her crate. It’s just easier and less stressful for her that way. While she was out, she only had one minor reactive moment (I hesitate to even call it that) with a puppy who had escaped from her handler and made her way to Risa’s backside. I cued Risa to come with me a couple times but the puppy was too persistent and didn’t want to leave Risa alone. So Risa turned and did an open-mouth lunge towards the pup. Risa never made a sound and, as soon as the pup went “Whoa!” and backed off, Risa was right back to looking at me. Totally appropriate and not over-the-top like she used to be! She was a bit of a jerk about her crate, though, and grumbled at several dogs who got too close or nosy while she was in there. Even with the blankets covering it up.

When it came time to demo she did really well. I did lose her focus a lot; mostly while heeling. It’s okay, though. I always remember the audience and many of them haven’t seen dogs doing tricks like Risa does. Or they struggle getting their dogs to “sit” on cue. Whatever we do probably looks pretty impressive. Besides, we’re having fun!! I was impressed that Risa was able to do her go out and circle the basketball. I figured that would fall apart but she nailed it. It was great.

I hadn’t originally planned on staying the entire time knowing how potentially stressful things would be. When asked if we would be staying for the afternoon to demo again, I said “Yes.” Risa seemed comfortable and not overly stressed out or scared. So we demoed again in the afternoon. It was a bit uglier in the afternoon as far as precision, focus, and execution but it was still good enough considering. (I got to work on my improv skills!) But the same could be said for all of the dogs who were demoing. Even the ones with solid temperaments and better focus had some trouble in the afternoon. It made me feel better about my own dog’s performance as well.

Even more encouraging than the wows from the audience were the compliments from my fellow club members when we returned to the tent after our dance. They were all really impressed with Risa and her skills. Risa rocked it and I am so very proud of her. It’s really incredible how far she’s come.

About Jamie

I'm just a traditionally-trained artist with interests in dog training. I currently teach classes at the local obedience training club (tricks, freestyle, and Rally-FrEe) and I also teach classes professionally for an organization who helps veterans train their own service dogs.
This entry was posted in Canine Freestyle, Dog Sports, Fear, Fenzi Academy, Reactivity, Training. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *